NCR News October 1944

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A picnic, held at Old River, recently, was one of the high spots of Electrical Research Department’s activities of the year. Top billing on the program was the ball game with a large crowd of spectators.

The ball game between the WAVES and civilian girls was taken by the girls from Sugar Camp (top group). The Civilians played a game but losing battle.

ELECTRICAL RESEARCH

By Mary Maeder and Mickie McNerney

Correspondents

Biggest event to date was the picnic held August 26 at Old River, in which the whole department participated. A lot of people worked hard to put it over and I think that everyone thoroughly enjoyed himself.

The inevitable ball game rated first spot on the program and Navy fans found it to be their day to crow. In the first game, a fast and furious contest between the sailors, marines and the civilian men, the servicemen had the edge from the beginning. And our civilian girls, though they put on a good show, were defeated by the WAVES, making it a complete naval victory.

A laugh a minute was the theme for various contests in which everyone participated. Did you ever try playing ball with an egg? Well, we did, and I know quite a number of the fellows who will never try ti again after that side-splitting and slightly gooey egg-throwing contest. Then the stick race, in which many creaky bcks and rusty legs got a complete, if hasty, workout.

Sight of the day was that row of very dignified young ladies standing on a table and sucking energetically on pop bottles with nipples. I can’t really remember which was funnier, that or the ice cream eating contest in which partners fed each other, or the cracker eating contest in which those young ladies that never learned to whistle were sadly out of luck. But I know it was all fun, though those foolhardy and gullible souls who entered every contest (like me) were sadly wondering at the end of the day just where all their energy went.

Water Exhibition

Our hearty appreciation was extended to WAVE Betty Bemis, endurance swimming champion, who gave an exhibition at the pool, and to Ralph Hept, whose exhibition of surf board and water ski riding on the lagoon was something to remember.

That delicious dinner served by the Commissary would have been enough to top off an ordinary picnic. But not this one! Surprise of the year was an exhibition of the talent in Building No. 26 in a delightful little revue. Orchestra renditions, songs, dances, and comedy acts made up a program that was, though amateur, real entertainment. The program was completed with the falling of dusk and friends parted and families went their various ways; the comments expressed denoted a day well spent and another happy event to add to various memory books.

Weddings

Congratulations to Jack Wade, who was married September 2, and to Evelyn Pauly, who was also married recently.

You know you’ve seen everything if you witnessed Ruth Crane the other day, clinging to the side of the Inspection Department cage, making faces at the inmates. Could be she wanted a peanut. By the way, Ruth, we’re wondering who the boy friend is.

Our best wishes for happy days ahead are extended to Zetta Kavaluskas, whose engagement was recently announced.

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ELECTRICAL RESEARCH

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Imagine her surprise when Grace Williams opened the package so graciously presented her by the fellows in 107 and found an overly ripe banana which had undoubtedly seen better days. The story goes that Frank Bucher had promised the fellows he’d bring them some bananas, and when he showed up with this one and it looked so nice and black and squashy that they decided it would make a most appropriate gift for one fair lady. Needless to say, Gracie sent it back with her sincerest regrets.

Best Wishes

So long and lots of luck to Ellen Paetschke, Minerva Weissinger, Betty Mintern, Jane Bolenger, Margaret Mantis, Lois Earnest, Marie Rice, Grace Reynolds, Merle Dickensheets, Pauline Fencho, June Scott, Charley Moyer, Bob Ruble and Dick Rose, who are leaving to go to school, and to Mary Lou Elmore, who is leaving to take Nurses Training.

A fond farewell is extended to Betty Mantis, Betty Hand and Dorothy Brubaker, who left to join their husbands.

Not exactly leaving but deserving our best wishes are Jerry Rousch and John Mooney, who are entering Co-op School.

Have you heard the latest about “Corky”? They tell me she has “Mortimer’s” picture hanging above her bench, and upon investigation I found quite a collection of interesting pictures in her gallery. Drop in some day and glance over these rare masterpieces.

Birthdays in October include those of Ruth Crane, Bill Simmons, Jimmy Orphal, Beryl Wilson, Ed Elliot, Ed Frederick, Mary Etta Thalman and Mable Weidner.

Your correspondent takes this space to report a happy Labor Day vacation spent at Indian Lake with Jess Jennings, of Model Making, and that most-seen-together couple, Joanna Heaton and Ed DeLaet. Betty Moseman also spent her two-day vacation at Indian Lake. And Mrs. Chafee tells me the fish in Michigan were really biting when she was u at Morrison Lake over Labor Day.

SPOTLIGHT!

HELEN MOCK

One of the best known persons in Building No. 26 is Helen Mock, an instructor on production. It is hard to put into words our opinion of Helen, as we’ve heard her friends say “She is just one grand person.” Just to know her is to admire her.

An unwavering interest in her work, her patience in training new girls and an ever present smile have made Helen well liked by her fellow workers and respected by her superiors.

She’s a hard worker, but a worker with a motive. Like many women in these times, she wants to do her bit to win the war and get her husband home as soon as possible. So we take off our hats to Helen Mock, the kind of a woman you’d like to know.