Cryptologic Museum Recommended Reading

From a handout found at the National Cryptologic Museum Library, October 2019:

20 books recommended by the Cryptologic Museum

  1. The Codebreakers, by David Kahn.
  2. The Secret Sentry, by Matthew Aid
  3. Battle of Wits, by Stephen Budiansky
  4. Code Warriors, by Stephen Budiansky
  5. Code Girls, by Liza Mundy
  6. The Woman Who Smashed Codes, by Jason Fagone
  7. The Puzzle Palace, by James Bamford
  8. Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency, by James Bamford
  9. The Reading of Gentlemen’s Mail, by David Kahn
  10. Seizing the Enigma, by David Kahn
  11. Codes, Ciphers and Other Cryptic and Clandestine Communications, by Fred Wrixon
  12. Alan Turing: The Enigma, by Andrew Hodges
  13. Playing to the Edge, Michael Hayden
  14. The Code Book, by Simon Singh
  15. Unsolved, by Craig Bauer
  16. Unlikely Warriors, by Lonnie Long and Gary Blackburn
  17. The Price of Vigilance, by Larry Tart and Robert Keefe
  18. Joe Rochefort’s War, by Elliot Carlson
  19. Between Silk and Cyanide: A Codemaker’s Story, by Leo Marks
  20. The Riddle of the Labyrinth, by Margalit Fox
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  • INSIDE YOU’LL FIND …

    WHO worked during the war? Find the Personnel section. Also, Joseph R. Desch
    WHAT were their goals? By the Numbers. Also, The US Bombe
    WHY? History of the Bombe Project A contemporary account of the reasons and the plans for their project for the Director of Naval Communications, 1944.
    WHERE was the project: In Dayton, it was in Building 26. In Washington, it was housed at the Naval Communications Annex
  • Contemporary Code Breaking

    Cracking the code, from ABC News. How is code breaking used these days? What kind of mind do you need to have to be a code breaker? Or can computers do it all? Phillip Clark took a look.
  • Crypto Dictionary published

    Crypto Dictionary, book review at ZDNet: A useful AZ of cryptography definitions Crypto Dictionary covers standards, conferences, key websites, historical references and anecdotes ...